Do not be played out by hatred and fear

When everyone was still a small little kid, we all know very well how to get our parents to buy the toys that we wanted. Sometimes we beg. At times we cry. The worst of all is to throw a tantrum and get what you want. All these involved influencing our parents through emotions. Either they felt pity over the cries and give them the things that they wanted. Or they are just simply feeling frustrated over the tantrum and wanted to stop it.

Hardly there is any kid would negotiate and articulate the valid reasons on why they would need this or that toy. They aren’t even knowledgable enough yet to tell their parents that certain toys would help develop their brains or physical ability. Emotion is the easiest way to influence their parents.
This is us humans. Most of the time when things happen, we tend to be influenced by our emotions first then only we start to think rationally. But sometimes certain decisions made were too late before we start to think.

A life example would be when we wanted to buy a smartphone. When we are looking out for choices, we are easily influenced by the advertisement or peer pressure. We are attracted to how some smartphones can perform, the technology that it has, the newest apps that it can supports and many other amazing features. We wanted to feel trendy. We wanted to feel technologically-savvy. We want people to know that we are using the best smartphone. Subconsciously, we will then buy the smartphone and then only realise that we probably use some of the feature only.

The same thing happens in politics. Think about it, in public speeches, why do some politicians used words that will incite hatred, fear or anger? Why do they raise up the mistakes of their opponents more than telling the people on what their own capabilities are?

We have to look into the recent issue by DAP’s Hew Kuan Yau or better known as ‘Superman’. It is widely known throughout the nation how vulgar and offensive his words are in his speeches. Many times, at the end of the speech, he makes people feel so angry towards the government.

Last week, when the ‘Beauty and the Beast’ movie was banned due to a gay character, Hew Kuan Yau has posted very offensive remarks towards the Prime Minister and his wife on Facebook. I may agree that the movie shouldn’t be banned and the Censorship Board has to review their guidelines. But then, I don’t think that Hew has to resort to throw in vulgar and offensive remarks towards the PM. Due to that, he was arrested by the police.

If we can recall, remember in the middle of 2016, Hew announced that he quits DAP due to his Facebook postings in which he insisted that South China Sea belongs to China, drawing the ire of netizens.
Today, when he was detained by the police, suddenly the DAP top leaders were standing next to him backing him up over the ‘Beauty and the Beast’ issue.

I don’t have to explain much, but look at how the DAP plays on issues that easily plays the emotions of the public.

The same goes to the many attitudes of other politicians including the ones from DAP, Pakatan Harapan or even Barisan Nasional. Politicians are people who have followers, it is only a matter of the numbers. It is important to show the people especially the followers on how we should behave in the community.

The same things goes to the Tanjong MP, Ng Wei Aik who has parked his car illegally on a walking pavement and just exactly beside a fire hydrant. The Penang state government has been so aggressively issuing summons and towing cars which has been parked at illegal spaces; and yet an elected representative coming from the party that governs Penang is doing the exact opposite. It is a big slap to their own party leaders that they do not walk their talk. He has even brushed off the journalist who asked for his opinion on that matter.

Therefore, we must remind ourselves that the leader that we choose not only must know how to govern a state or represents the constituents. But an elected representative’s character is also important in shaping the community that follows them.

This article has been published in Mandarin in Kwong Wah Yit Poh dated 24th March 2017.

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